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Step 4: Troubleshooting Dilemmas and Celebrating Success

At this point, the finish line is in sight.  Most of the work has been completed and looks good.  You’re proud of what you’ve done and how much your effort has paid off.  However, there’s a few places that have emerged as dilemmas.  Not terrible, but not working as it should and those few things are marring an otherwise terrific performance.  Hmmm . . . how to fix?


Troubleshooting issues is honestly my favorite part of the process.  It requires me to put all my knowledge, experience, and skill to the test as I weigh my options.  It’s also the part that feels like I’m on the edge between potential greatness or epic failure.  Courage and boldness is usually what’s required at this point, and that’s when I know I’m about to learn something BIG.  I love the adrenaline rush!  Of course sometimes, when I’m at the end of my knowledge and completely exhausted, I feel like I just want somebody else to fix it.  I don’t have any more answers!  That’s when I take a deep breath, stay calm, and just keep trying.  I know I’m on the brink of learning something new here, too.


When last we left the walkway, it was mostly done and looking good, but there were some dilemmas that required special attention.  Odd gaps, unique placements, and time slipping away, I notice my supplies are running low as well.  I’ve got to bring this thing to a positive conclusion utilizing what I have available to me right now. After consideration, I decided to create a new pattern to fix some overall gaps, used smaller “bricks” to fill in odd spaces . . .

 

and in the end just left some gaps as is.
Each fix was specific to one problem, but it had to address the problem both individually and systemically. The solution had to work for both that individual problem AND it had to enhance the overall outcome for the entire project.  There’s the rub.  Sometimes a solution might be found to address the individual problem, but doing so would diminish the positive impact of the rest of the work.  At that point, it might not be perfect but you just have to be happy about it and not rage out.  The success of the whole is more valuable than getting every little thing perfect. Japanese Zen art tells us that the 1% is a valuable part of the finished piece – it reminds us that there is always an opposite to keep us balanced and humble.  The 1% is our human shortcoming and the 99% is the wow we are able to bring into the world.  The 99% is where we’ve been; the 1% is where we start next.  The 1% is where we have never gone before.


And then just like that . . . you’re done!  It sneaks up on you as you persevere until suddenly you look up and realize – it’s finished.  Do take some time to celebrate, congratulate yourself (and your team, if applicable), and admire the results of all your hard work.  Rest, enjoy, and then, when the time is right, let your mind wander to the next project you want to take on . . . and start the journey again.
Thanks for coming with me on this thought journey!

 

So what project are you thinking about taking on this year?

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