My First Lessons in Leadership came from STAR TREK

My earliest and fondest memories include watching #STAR TREK with my mom.  I remember being riveted by how the crew would manage to solve an episode’s challenges, and as I grew, fascinated by the subtle interpersonal relationships that formed the foundation for just about every decision they made. Through the stories of the USS Enterprise, the crew presented solid lessons in teamwork and leadership.  That melding of personal connection, teamwork, and leadership is what makes STAR TREK’s crew such a unique study in how to be leaders. Let me share what the crew has taught me over the years.


  • When the way forward is uncertain, the Captain goes first.
The Captain never asks others to do the hard, dangerous, or potentially career-ending work for him. Instead, he goes first and takes on the uncertainty to secure a way forward for his team and the mission.


  • When safety is compromised, the Captain goes last.
The Captain makes sure everyone else is safe or getting out of harm’s way before he works to save himself.  The crew’s safety is his top priority.


  • Duty first.
Every member of the crew – from the Captain on down – always does their best to do their duty under all circumstances, whether they personally feel it’s a great idea or not.  Their commitment to follow-through on the principles, beliefs, and missions of the Federation allow the Captain to trust in their mutual loyalty and determination to see it through when it comes time to give an order and set a course of action for them all.


  • Never give up – fight to the end.
Although there are times when the crew has to take a passive mien in order to gain a tactical advantage, the intention is always to go down fighting in order to triumph in the end.  When one of the members of the leadership team knows something is not right, they battle on to set it right, no matter what the obstacle or personal cost.  Never give up, never surrender to make it easier on yourself.


  • Your team is the most important thing.
When the crew has to do battle, they make sure they fight for their team, with their team, as a team.  The team knows they are stronger together and the odds of success are much higher when they each use their unique abilities to work together to win the day for others, as well as themselves.


  • Keep your composure – always.
When all hell is breaking loose around them and the situation is grim at best, the crew keeps their composure and remains steady in the face of chaos.  They keep thinking and moving their way through it – to the last person, the last resource, the last second if need be – until they bring the situation under control.  There is no room for panic, indecision, or weakness; they just stay calm and lead on.


  • Keep it personal.
Although the work they do might be “just business”, the reason they do it is very personal.  If they have any success at all, it is because of the personal connections they have with each other that sustain and back them along the way.  When the crisis is over, the crew always reconnects on a personal level.  It’s in those moments of recovery that they not only make sense of what happened, but they strengthen their bonds and commitments to each other.  Celebrating success and acknowledging everyone’s contributions to that success is what recements everyone’s commitment to make it happen again when faced with the next challenge.  And there will always be another challenge.


Although I have learned many things about leadership over the years and even earned a doctorate in educational leadership, there’s always more to learn and experience.  And yet – if STAR TREK’s crew had been my only reference point for how to be a leader, it wouldn’t have been the worst teacher on the subject.


As we head out to our continuing missions, to seek out new people and new frontiers, we will boldly go where no one has gone before . . . because the crew of the Enterprise showed us the way.

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